Covenant College faculty members take courageous stand...

Picture_4 (Tim, w/thanks to Dave) Last week, a friend in Florida wrote to call my attention to an article detailing the results of a political survey of the faculty at Covenant College, the school affiliated with the Presbyterian Church in America. (Students were polled, also.)

Conducted by the school's Director of Institutional Research, Kevin Eames, the survey received responses from 47 faculty members. Here's what Covenant's administration wants prospective students and their parents to know about these faculty members:

Eighty-eight percent of Covenant's faculty have doctorates or terminal degrees, earned from such institutions as Oxford, Stanford, Yale, and the University of Chicago. Our professors regularly involve students in their research activities.  In fact, many students actually help edit books that their professors are writing.

The administration goes on to describe faculty members as "passionate about teaching and sharing their Reformed faith in a setting that sharpens the intellect and encourages increased awe of our sovereign God." Then, by way of reassurance, Oxford and passion are anchored by the declaration that "all faculty members subscribe to the Westminster Confession of Faith."

So, what might doctorates from Yale and Stanford, combined with a passion for the reformed faith and the Westminster Standards, lead these men and women to profess to our children about Christ's dominion in these United States and our own confession of that faith in this election year?

Asked, "Do you believe John McCain is a Christian," 33 of the 47 faculty members responding said either "No" or "Not sure." This seems safe since I read just last night that Senator McCain has never received Christian baptism. Likely not one of those faculty members questioning Senator McCain's Christian faith knew that, though.

Still, my concern is certainly not to prove Senator McCain's Christian faith, to get others to agree that he's sincere in his Christian profession, or leastwise to write this post to the end that even one reader will decide to vote for him or the Republican party. Such concerns have not entered my mind.

But on to Senator Obama. Different candidate, same question: "Do you believe Barack Obama is a Christian?" Twenty-one faculty members are definite in their response with five answering "No" and sixteen "Yes."

What ocular disease has led sixteen of our best and brightest to say for the record among students they are paid to lead into a greater knowledge of Christ's Lordship over all the earth that a man who unabashedly promotes baby-slaughter and sodomite marriage is certainly a Christian? If Senator Obama is a Christian, Robert Mugabe is born again and Jean Paul Sartre was a strict subscriptionist Presbyterian pastor.

Or, put another way...

if Senator Obama is a Christian, the Word of God is meaningless when it declares this concerning those who will never enter Heaven:

But for the cowardly and unbelieving and abominable and murderers and immoral persons and sorcerers and idolaters and all liars, their part will be in the lake that burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death. (Revelation 21:8)

Outside are the dogs and the sorcerers and the immoral persons and the murderers and the idolaters, and everyone who loves and practices lying. (Revelation 22:15)

Also, note that whereas fourteen faculty members are sure of Senator McCain's faith, sixteen are sure of the Christian faith of Senator Obama. Not to put too fine a point on it, but more Covenant faculty members are certain that a promoter of baby-slaughter and sodomite marriage is a Christian than a man who opposes baby-slaughter and sodomite marriage.

What about their votes?

After the above, no one will be shocked to find out thirty-five percent of Covenant's faculty members say they're likely to vote for Senator Obama. That's one third of the faculty supporting the presidential candidacy of the most radically pro-baby slaughter politician in Washington D.C.

Over the years, I've voted for George McGovern, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagen, and George Bush, but I've never been politically partisan. My calling is the church so I rarely address politics, particularly in light of the unconstitutional government and two-party farce we've had in the US for many years, now. As Johnson puts it, all schemes of political improvement are laughable things.

Nevertheless, our president has a tremendous impact on pursuing justice for the oppressed around the world as death tolls due to warfare, systemic poverty, AIDS, hunger, and global warning mount higher each day. For this reason, Covenant's faculty was asked to rate "issues for their importance in selecting a (presidential) candidate," and among those listed were "campaign finance reform," "education," "global warming," "health care," and "social justice." And yes, "abortion" was there, but no mention of sodomy or sodomite marriage.

Interestingly, only half the faculty members considered "abortion" to be "Very important" in their selection in their anticipated vote for a presidential candidate. This means half of the faculty members made a conscious decision to respond that abortion was not "Very important." What got a higher rating than abortion?

"Social justice." Abortion had a rating average of 3.23 whereas "Social justice" won with 3.40. (Ten faculty members responded that abortion was either "Not important" (2) or only "Somewhat important" (8), but only one faculty member responded that social justice was "Not important" and just two that it was only "Somewhat important."

For the top rating, "Very important," three issues tied in the faculty's vote: "Abortion," "Health care," and "Social justice," with "Social justice" taking the honors.

Covenant's president, Niel Nielson, might suggest the school's chaplain invite  Submergent  (they themselves call it Emergent) Church leader, Donald Miller, to visit the campus and preach in chapel along the theme of his mini-sermon given as a bendiction to the Democratic National Convention in Denver last month. In fine Balaam (Numbers 22-24) form, he declaimed:

Please join me for the next few moments in our Benediction.

Father God, This week, as the world looks on, help the leaders in this room create a civil dialogue about our future. We need you, God, as individuals and also as a nation. We need you to protect us from our enemies, but also from ourselves, because we are easily tempted toward apathy.

Give us a passion to advance opportunities for the least of these, for widows and orphans, for single moms and children whose fathers have left. Give us the eyes to see them, and the ears to hear them, and hands willing to serve them.

Help us serve people, not just causes. And stand up to specific injustices rather than vague notions.

Give those in this room who have power, along with those who will meet next week, the courage to work together to finally provide health care to those who don’t have any, and a living wage so families can thrive rather than struggle.

Help us figure out how to pay teachers what they deserve and give children an equal opportunity to get a college education. Help us figure out the balance between economic opportunity and corporate gluttony. We have tried to solve these problems ourselves but they are still there. We need your help.

Father, will you restore our moral standing in the world? A lot of people don’t like us but that’s because they don’t know the heart of the average American. Will you give us favor and forgiveness, along with our allies around the world? Help us be an example of humility and strength once again.

Lastly, father, unify us. Even in our diversity help us see how much we have in common.
And unify us not just in our ideas and in our sentiments—but in our actions, as we look around and figure out something we can do to help create an America even greater than the one we have come to cherish.

God we know that you are good.

Thank you for blessing us in so many ways as Americans.

I make these requests in the name of your son, Jesus, who gave his own life against the forces of injustice.

Let Him be our example.

Amen.

Certainly Covenant faculty members aren't alone in their support for Senator Obama's presidential aspirations. Lots and lots of "Christians" were pleased as punch to join Miller in his prayer. But, get this: Before the watching world, Miller was using the Glorious Name of Jesus Christ to call down our Heavenly Father's blessing on the party that believes in, and has a mandatory plank in its platform advocating the slaughter of 1,300,000 unborn children each year who are tenderly nestled in their mothers' wombs by the providence of God.

The Democratic Party strongly and unequivocally supports Roe v. Wade and a woman’s right to choose a safe and legal abortion, regardless of ability to pay, and we oppose any and all efforts to weaken or undermine that right. (Democratic Party Platform, August 2008)

Although of far less magnitude than baby-slaughter, it should also be noted that the Democrats are the sodomy and sodomite marriage party, also.

And this charlatan has the audacity to use the Name of our Lord Jesus Christ as He calls down God's blessing on this immorality and child-slaughter! What a tragedy no donkey rebuked or stopped him.

Our nation is filled with lemmings who think soft thoughts and call them prophetic. But they're absolutely predictable, born in the sentiments passing as reason and thought found in the pages of the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Christianity Today, and the list goes on...

But where is righteousness, where is social justice when no one utters a word in defense of the millions of babies slaughtered each year around the world--over 75,000,000 per year by World Health Organization estimates?

Back at Covenant, one third of the faculty join MIller in claiming the Name of Christ for supporting the party drowning in the sea of blood of little children sacrificed to Molech while they chatter on about AIDS and hunger and malaria and nationalized health care and social justice.

They claim to care about "Social injustice," but refuse to mark "Abortion" as "Very important?" This is on the level of German Christians during the Third Reich claiming to be concerned about the social stigma faced by Jews in some parts of their nation. Undoubtedly many of them viewed their faith as highly evolved; prophetic even.

Undoubtedly, many also thought Dietrich Bonhoeffer and the godly believers a part of the Confessing Church weren't sufficiently progressive. That they were incapable of sustaining a rational argument. That they were blinkered, philistine, and pig-ignorant. Surely they warned their students against them and pointed out how no official respectable means of communication saw fit to publish them. Probably called them "pamphleteers" with a sneer.

Shall we point out the obvious? The bloodshed of abortion absolutely dwarfs the injustices and any bloodshed these progressive self-described "Christians" claim to be concerned about.

But are they aware of this simple fact?

No, of course not; and neither were Third Reich Lutherans aware of the millions of Christians and Jews their next-door neighbors were herding into the showers and shoveling out of the furnaces.

Let's be specific. Here are accurate estimates of the death toll, each year, caused by things we may be able to influence by our national policies regardless of the countries we live in. In other words, I'm not including cancer, heart disease, etc. because these will be hard to assign blame concerning.

So what are the annual totals, worldwide, of the things we may be able significantly to influence with political action?

Malaria: 1.5 million
TB: 2.6 million
AIDS: 5.2 million
Diarrheal diseases: 3.1 million
Childhood cluster diseases: 1.9 million
Nutritional deficiencies: 800,000
Traffic accidents: 2.0 million
Violence: 948,000
War: 240,000

GRAND TOTAL: 18,500,000

SLAUGHTER OF BABIES: 78,000,000

Add to the slaughter of babies, the slaughter of the elderly by starvation and medical intervention with morphine and such life-suppressants, the slaughter of the newborn defective, and the total is absolutely staggering.

All as Donald Miller and Covenant College faculty members chatter on about national health care and social justice, promising their vote to Senator Barack Obama.

Really, although God cares mightily about the slaughter of the innocents (He does, after all, tell us He's the father of orphans and widows in their distress), these Christians couldn't care less. So they drone on about economic justice and parity and world trade and a civil discussion and a better reputation around the world for the US and blather, blather, blather. But it all adds up to nothing more than desiring to avoid the shame of the Cross.

I understand foreigners being deluded about American politics, but Donald Miller and confessionally reformed professors holding Ph.D.s from Yale, Oxford, and Stanford while subscribing to the Westminster Confession and claiming to be passionate about the Reformed Christian faith?

Oh my, these men are slick! Like Balaam, they know precisely what they're doing.

Donald Miller stands in solidarity with the party whose chief distinguishing mark in American politics is their aggressive advocacy of more bloodshed of babies, and whose second most distinguishing mark is advocacy of sodomy, and he blesses them in the Name of Jesus!

Meditating on the Judgment Seat of Almighy God, will he explain to us why he said nothing about the sodomites who are dying of AIDS here in the United States with no protection from our government--no quarantines such as our public health laws have enforced in other national health emergencies like polio or TB? Will he explain to us why he didn't mention the little babies being slaughtered across our fair land  as he preached to the Democratic National Convention? Will our Covenant College professors explain to us precisely why they made a conscious choice not to mark the slaughter of 78,000,000 unborn children around the world each year as "Very important?"

Normally, I'd be proud of a pastor who actually dared to pray explicitly in Jesus' Name at any public function outside the privacy of a church, but in this case I believe it was blasphemy.

Fellow presbytery members, members of WIC, stated clerks of sessions, ruling elders, deacons, Titus 2 women, and parents of the Presbyterian Church in America, consider carefully where you send your money and precious children. Yes, of course there are excellent and godly trustees, adminstrators, and faculty members at Covenant. Who's ever said otherwise?

However, in the care of souls, who among us would knowingly place someone we loved in a lottery where  beforehand we knew our loved one had about a thirty-three percent chance of coming under the authority and influence of a professor who wouldn't agree that abortion was "very important" in his selection of a presidential candidate, and who publicly acknowledged he intended to cast his ballot for a man who believed the protection sodomites needed was affirmative action and marriage?

About a decade ago, our eldest son, Joseph, narrowed his college choices down to Vanderbilt and Covenant, but couldn't make up his mind between the two. It came to the final day for him to notify the school where he would matriculate. His mother and I didn't know what he'd choose.

We got up the next morning and asked him what he'd decided?

He said he was going to Vanderbilt.

"How did you make your decision," we asked?

"Well, I was thinking that one of my weaknesses is that I tend to trust people too easily. And as I thought about it, I realized this meant at Covenant I'd trust everyone, including people I should not trust. But at Vanderbilt I'd be on guard from the beginning."

About right, isn't it? Mary Lee and I are so happy Joseph went to Vanderbilt rather than Covenant. If a child of mine is going to be corrupted by idols waiting for destruction, I want his infection to come from honest pagans--not dishonest men who claim to be Christians and spend their lives (and my money) explaining how someone passionate about the Reformed Christian faith who holds to the Westminster Standards has made his peace, and is able to encourage his students to vote for a man for president of these United States who unabashedly defends the shedding of the blood of 1,300,000 unborn children across our nation each year.

For twenty-five years or so, my own Dad worked on college campuses across our country with Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. While he and Mud had graduated from Wheaton, most campuses where he spoke to students were entirely secular. He and Mud began in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as I-V staff for all the schoools in the Boston area. Years later, he supervised I-V's eastern seaboard, edited I-V's national magazine, His, and was the publisher of Inter-Varsity Press. What advice did he regularly give concerning the selection of a college for covenant children?

"If you go to a Christian college, you'll never know who the enemy is. At a secular school, though, it will be very clear."

Comments

Psa 139:21 Do I not hate those who hate You, O LORD? And do I not loathe those who rise up against You?

There is simply no excuse for supporting that death monger Obama and absolutely no reason to think that anyone who does so belongs to the Lord Jesus Christ, professors at Covenant College not withstanding. Despicable brood of vipers the lot of them its time they were rooted out from under the institutional rocks where they hide. Imprecatory prayers are in order.

I wish I wasn't able to say this, but this explains some things I've seen in the past few years. And I'm not even a Presbyterian. (no details except I strove to adhere to Matthew 18)

I'll pray that Covenant soon proves me wrong here, but I won't be holding my breath. I'll also be praying that this kind of thing doesn't raise its head at my church's seminary, Central Baptist. I've got a little more confidence there.

CBTS? Of the American Baptists? Where Molly Marshall is president?

This one, and my apologies for the confusion.

http://www.centralseminary.edu/

Pr. Tim,

First, thank you for setting a clear example of how, what, and why readers of this blog should make protests which mutatis mutandis are called for in their own ecclesiastical settings.

In view of this, can you supply us with a source for the stats you cited on various causes of death compared with the toll from abortion. I expect that some here, wishing to cite these figures, would also need to be prepared to cite the sources of the numbers. My earnest hope is that they derive from some non-Christian source, such as the WHO.

All I can say is that I am deeply thankful to the Lord for The Master's College, where our son received a fabulous education by godly men at a school that does not equivocate. John MacArthur's leadership is evident from stem to stern at Master's.

See their website...www.masters.edu

Tim, am I losing my mind? Some think so. But this kind of stuff is making me crazy! Is this where our denominational money is going?

Years ago I was in the Southern Baptist Convention. Those brothers did in fact see what was coming in the way of liberal theology. It was on their doorsteps in fact. They recognized (correctly) that the future survival of their (our, at the time) denomination rested largely at the college and seminary level. As the colleges and seminaries go, so would eventually go the churches, as the pastors would take their heresies into the congregations and poison them. Solution? Take control BACK of the colleges and seminaries. That they did.

I suggest that our PCA is in a similar place. So long as men (and sadly women?) come out of our college and seminary having been instructed such and fan out into the churches, our denomination has a bleak future!

Les, the SBTS where Al Mohler is president? I had heard they had booted out the evangelical feminist faction and taken control back, as well, but in the last post Tim says Dr. Mohler is sharing the podium at a theological conference with a woman. Is that a sign things are going back the other way? Dr. Mohler's arguments for why it is all right for Sarah Palin to leave home and family to run for VP sound just like the evangelical feminist arguments I see in the comments here whenever Tim or David defend orthodoxy on the issue of women's roles.

It's making me crazy, too.

(Why are there no comments on the last post, BTW?)

I agree with most, except this:

Meditating on the Judgment Seat of Almighy God, will he explain to us why he said nothing about the sodomites who are dying of AIDS here in the United States with no protection from our government--no quarantines such as our public health laws have enforced in other national health emergencies like polio or TB?

The reason is that, with very, very rare exception, most people who contract AIDS didn't have to if they didn't want to. You can catch polio by going about your business. But you only catch AIDS through drugs, sex and sodomy. My family has the AIDS vaccine, FAITH IN CHRIST, praise be to our merciful God, and so we don't need a quarantine if we're immune.

I should clarify myself. I said,

"I suggest that our PCA is in a similar place. So long as men (and sadly women?) come out of our college and seminary having been instructed such and fan out into the churches, our denomination has a bleak future!"

The "sadly" part of that statement was in reference to the fact that some women come out and seek to get into positions in churches for which the scripture does not call them. hence, "sadly."

Carmon, I saw that and am reminded that we must be as diligent as ever in protecting truth. The enemy never, never sleeps. Yes that is the same SBC, and what Tim posted is indeed troubling if true (and I have no reason to doubt it). However, if men had not fought against liberalism back in the 1980s and 1990s in the SBC, we would not even talking about them in this context, They would be dead. But you bring up a good point.

Senator Obama would be encourgaged to know that he has the support of 35.6 percent of the faculty at Covenant College. Apparently these professors think Obama would be a nursing father to the church. That in their desire to be faithful to Scripture, the Reformed Faith and the Great Commission an Obama presidency would be helpful to the PCA in achieving that goal.

There was a reason why some were very vocal about not having the RPCES in the PCA back during 1981-82. The main reason was Covenant Seminary and Covenant College. One reason was money. They felt at the time the PCA could not afford either school. The other was their recent experience in the PCUS. No matter what charges of false teaching was laid before presbytery, synod or general assembly, those bodies refused to discipline those who taught opposite Holy Scripture.

These men felt by accepting these two schools, the PCA would open themselves up to the same temptation of not disciplining those who taught error because they taught at "our schools".

Sadly, if 35% of the faculty of Covenant College would vote to elect Sen. Obama then it says they do not take seriously the vows to uphold the standards of the church which gives them a living and more importantly control. I would suggest that go back and read the WLC and WSC on the 6th commandment.

Should an individual who has contact with high school students subsequently steer these youth away from Covenant College? If so, does anyone have any other suggestions for where to send them (I'm sure Berkeley's out of the running)?

Tim,

You raise some good very good points. The whole social justice thing bewilders me. Thanks for the stats from the World Health Organization.

In looking over the survey 79% of the faculty say that abortion is either important or very important (question #8). Another 17% say that it is somewhat important. So about 96% of the faculty see it as an important issue (45 out of 47 faculty).

Abortion came in a close second to social justice when comparing the rating average in the same question (Abortion received a 3.23 and social justice a 3.40). 44 out of 47 faculty members rated this as either somewhat important, important or very important.

I'm disappointed that these issues are not reversed and that abortion didn't receive a higher score.

There is a silver lining in question 15: 60% of faculty (as of the date of survey) plan to vote for John McCain. Who knows, the other 40% may have a change of mind as we lead up to the election.

I know that you'll take heat because of this post but thank-you for your courage. May it be used to sway many to see the importance choosing life over abortion on demand -- there isn't a more important issue.

>>Should an individual who has contact with high school students subsequently steer these youth away from Covenant College? If so, does anyone have any other suggestions for where to send them

I was once given this sage advise by my youth pastor and his wife - have your child pick a school with a vibrant RUF program and they will stand a much better chance of coming out of college unscathed by unbelief. To quote a Bayly - "its always easier to fly against the wind" hence choosing a secular college is often less spiritually dangerous than choosing a "christian" college

>But at Vanderbilt I'd be on guard from the beginning."

That's really funny because that's how I've wondered at times if we should feel about Lighthouse Christian Academy here in Bloomington.

A pastor's son from a founding LCA family in Bloomington who's parents have served extensively at LCA once said to me, "I think some of the kids at LCA would be better off at public school because there they'd be more on guard for evil."

> They recognized (correctly) that the future survival of their (our, at the time) denomination rested largely at the college and seminary level. As the colleges and seminaries go, so would eventually go the churches, as the pastors would take their heresies into the congregations and poison them. Solution? Take control BACK of the colleges and seminaries. That they did.

Les, I couldn't agree more. That's why I used to think it was nutty that Tim Bayly's church has a "seminary" but then I saw in my reformed denomination that these problems were too deep rooted to throw our young men to the wolves of mainstream PC seminaries.

> The reason is that, with very, very rare exception, most people who contract AIDS didn't have to if they didn't want to

Well, I remember in Jr. High when AIDS first hit the mainstream thinking that they should quarantine people like they used to - we learned in our PC schools that this is a very childish view and that the correct intelligent thing is to pretend that AIDS is nothing.

I don't know if this is still the case but when my son was mistakenly diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (a fatal disease) I was told that there is virtually no funding for it because it's categorized as a preventable illness whereas AIDS is not. Clearly the way that the government dealt with AIDS is more political than objective and "scientific."

I wonder, maybe CF is considered preventable because if someone finds that they are pregnant and does a genetic screen they can abort the child, ya think? In that case, should they categorize AIDS as preventable because a bullet would cure it?

A silver lining?

But on to Senator Obama. Different candidate, same question: "Do you believe Barack Obama is a Christian?" Twenty-one faculty members are definite in their response with five answering "No" and sixteen "Yes."

I find that appalling. And from my admittedly, but unapologetically black and white world, that answer is grounds for dismissal from any institution calling itself Christian. Astounding!! A certain verse with the words "not everyone" and "Lord, Lord" comes to mind.

"But it all adds up to nothing more than desiring to avoid the shame of the Cross."

Precisely. Thank you for calling them out.

"If you go to a Christian college, you'll never know who the enemy is. At a secular school, though, it will be very clear."

Yep.

"If you go to a Christian college, you'll never know who the enemy is. At a secular school, though, it will be very clear."

Will it? I can appreciate the sentiment but I think it speaks to the failure of Christians to be as wise as serpents. If one isn’t discerning enough to identify the false brother in the church, then one isn’t going to be discerning enough to identify the real brother everywhere else. A tree is known by its fruit. That assumes of course, that one knows what the fruit looks like.

Good thoughts, all. While I hope that both senators are actually in Him, I must admit that there are certain strong indications that they're both in deep disobedience to the Gospel.

Good points on schools as well. I don't know Covenant except from a couple of anecdotes, but I sure do know that I want better for my kids than I had myself. NSA, PHC, GCC, and Hillsdale are coming to mind now...but thankfully I've got eight years to pray for schools like this to be ready for daughter #1, who turned 10 yesterday.

Will there be any action from this in the PCA?

Or will they continue to play Matador with the bull of Liberalism?

"Will there be any action from this in the PCA?"

With all due respect, and I acknowledge the legitimacy of your question, what would you expect the PCA to do?

On a somewhat related note...ByFaithOnline, the official PCA journal, recently asked virtually the same questions in a survey. It will be interesting and enlightening to see the results.

They provided a space for editorial comments after the questions.

Here are a few of my editorial comments...

Re- is Obama a Christian? NO. "You're kidding, right?"

Re- How important is abortion? VERY IMPORTANT. "Read the 6th Commandment"

Re- Will you vote for Obama? NO."You era kidding, right? How can a legitimate believer vote for an avowed proponent of infanticide?'

> With all due respect, and I acknowledge the legitimacy of your question, what would you expect the PCA to do?

Randy -- well, one simple thing to do is require nominees for Trustee to answer simple questions about their views on these matters and what actions they would take relevant to these matters. Every Trustee is up for re-election every four years -- those elections are there for a purpose, not as windowdressing.

Another would be to pass resolutions of various kinds clearly expressing the desires of the Assembly regarding certain important and fundamental aspects of the way Covenant College operates.

If I voted (which I don't, following my and my tradition's understanding of nonresistance), abortion wouldn't be an issue for me. Here's why:

Take the very similar sin of adultery/divorce and remarriage. McCain personally is worse than Obama (he is divorced and remarried, Obama is not). But divorce is not an issue for me, because neither Obama nor McCain has an willingness or ability to change the massive array of policies that enable a culture where divorce is ignored.

I see abortion as similar: it's a sin. Those who engage in it in any form are under God's righteous judgment. McCain is (maybe, sort of) personally more opposed to it than Obama, but I do not think that there will be any fewer abortions in the next 20 years if McCain is elected rather than Obama. Thus, for me, it's a non-issue: not becasue it isn't sin, not because it isn't evil, but because neither candidate is going to do anything to change the situation.

> but because neither candidate is going to do anything to change the situation.

Sam -- your unwillingness to participate in our political process is understandable, though I don't approve of it. With that said, though, I suspect you would have said the above words about the 2000 and 2004 elections with Bush. Nobody's going to change anything, so why bother? Supreme Court justices Roberts and Alito are evidence that you are wrong. Had Gore or Kerry been able to nominate justices instead of Bush our legal system would have been set back by decades, including abortions. This story will repeat itself with McCain and Obama. Of course, there is no long-term legal solution to our country's problems. Apart from the revival of the gospel our country will decline. This does not mean that law has no role, though, or that Presidents don't matter -- they do. And whether Obama or McCain is elected will have a significant impact on our country, including abortions and divorces.

By the way -- for all of our blame heaped on McCain for his divorce and remarriage (and I have heaped much myself) he did say at the Saddleback forum that that was his biggest regret and he considers it his most serious moral failure. Would that Obama had said the same about his opposition to Illinois state Born Alive Infant Protection Act.

I was curious to see if the College would have a response to this discussion. So, I went to their website for a look.

It is interesting to note that in March 2008, the Trustees adopted a document called Statement of Community Beliefs which interacts with various issues covered in the survey.

Here's a link to the document itself, which unambiguously asserts that abortion is a very significant issue, albeit not discussed in the context of a national election.

http://www.covenant.edu/pdf/statement_of_community_beliefs.pdf

The issue of "social justice" is closely annexed to abortion under the topic of Human Dignity.

Given that official Statement, why certain faculty members would view abortion as less than a very important issue, and why they would vote for an avowed enemy of the unborn is perplexing for sure!

And how a faculty member could assert that Obama is born again is even more perplexing, and disappointing.

I was curious to see if the College would have a response to this discussion. So, I went to their website for a look.

It is interesting to note that in March 2008, the Trustees adopted a document called Statement of Community Beliefs which interacts with various issues covered in the survey.

Here's a link to the document itself, which unambiguously asserts that abortion is a very significant issue, albeit not discussed in the context of a national election.

http://www.covenant.edu/pdf/statement_of_community_beliefs.pdf

The issue of "social justice" is closely annexed to abortion under the topic of Human Dignity.

Given that official Statement, why certain faculty members would view abortion as less than a very important issue, and why they would vote for an avowed enemy of the unborn is perplexing for sure!

And how a faculty member could assert that Obama is born again is even more perplexing, and disappointing.

As an addendum to my recent comment, the preface to the Statement of Community Beliefs specifically states that the positions taken in the document will be used by the Trustees in their hiring, evaluation and promotion of faculty members. The Statement calls for faculty to "fess up" to any differences they have with the Statement. And, it goes on to say that the Trustees will determine acceptable limits of variation from the Statement.

One can hope and expect that the Trustees will enforce this Statement rigorously. Only time will tell whether that's a realistic assumption.

So, it's a sin to believe social injustice is more important that abortion? When social injustice covers so many problems in the US and abortion covers one in particular?

I'm shocked at the judgment that's being cast upon those Covenant professors through this article. To question someone's faith and teachings because they are a democrat is wrong. Making statements that bash their beliefs based securely on a survey is not fair.

I believe this makes Covenant a better school. Having a difference of opinions makes one mature in their beliefs. Covenant is a liberal arts college and their motto is "In all things...Christ preeminent" and by having diverse political views, their students are challenged to connect their religious beliefs with politics.

I'm sure any Covenant students who read this will be appalled at the assumptions made of their professors and covenant family.

Dear By Grace,

You say that by having these "differing opinions," it makes Covenant a better school. By "better," do you mean more in line with the culture, more in line with Indiana University or Princeton or USC? If so, then what is the point of Covenant being biblically based? I know that it's not a very popular thing to take such a dogmatic stance when discussing Christianity, but really, what's the point in not? God's Word does give us specific answers to specific problems in all of life. It would be ludicrous, then, to say that Covenant is a Christian, biblical school and have parents pay money and send their children there, only to find out the what makes the school "better" is a diversity of opinions regarding the Bible, Christianity, and ethics. If one is looking for diversity to be a key element in the school of their choosing, then why not just go to a secular school? You could have more diversity there than you can shake a stick at.

>To question someone's faith and teachings because they are a democrat is wrong.

"By Grace," to the degree that you meant this statement to summarize even the smallest part of what I wrote, you are either grossly incapable of understanding what you read, you believe me to be a liar, or you are a liar yourself.

I could not have been more clear in stating that my concern has nothing to do with partisan politics. Several years ago when he was running, I'd have voted for Bob Casey in a heartbeat.

If you are going to argue, make an argument. And sign your full name, first and last, with a real e-mail address. Did you notice I've done so?

Many of these comments make me rather sad to be a part of the PCA. I like to think of us as a people that have experienced God's Grace in our lives and are about spreading the Good News of that Grace! Here we sound like a bunch of complaining children.....and so very hard and cold! It really has made me very sad to read this blog and the comments.

I have a great deal of respect for Covenant College and their Mission. It is an incredible school. Our family experiences of Covenant College have been very positive! My children have been stretched and grown while at Covenant. They have entered post-college years with an incredible world view and ability to defend their faith. And more importantly, they have a desire to spread God's Grace and Love to others. I am delighted and proud of every penny that we spent at Covenant College!

Vic,

Do you not see issues such as abortion as important? If you do, aren't you concerned about the beliefs of the professors at leading Christian colleges?

So, it's a sin to believe social injustice is more important that abortion?

Color me crazy By "Grace", but I think eliminating abortion is foundational to social justice.

If killing the helpless who are waiting to be born is fair game...well, you pretty much don't have a leg to stand on when pleading the case of the helpless that were so fortunate to exit their mother's womb in one piece.

"In all things...Christ preeminent" and by having diverse political views, their students are challenged to connect their religious beliefs with politics.

If abortion falls behind "social justice", then I don't think Christ is preeminent in their thinking. And then there's that word: "diversity". I've never met anybody more monolithic than the lovers of diversity.

I'm sure any Covenant students who read this will be appalled at the assumptions made of their professors and covenant family.

If the students received any education at all, they will have read this blog entry with more clarity than yourself. If, however, they would respond as you have...their educators *cough* brainwashers *cough* have succeeded.

Craig,

Or, as Abp Chaput has held - the right to life is *foundational* to every other right, for without life you have nothing.

Kamilla

Kamilla...thanks. That's a great way to put it. I will be stealing that quote.

> I'm sure any Covenant students who read this will be appalled at the assumptions made of their professors and covenant family.

I have some close friends who are Covenant College alumni and they will be ashamed of their former professors not of this blog.

:: disclaimer :: The following is the position of the writer only and may not necessarily reflect that of the owners of this blogsite. ::/disclaimer::

Many of these comments make me rather sad to be a part of the PCA.

I find your comments to be annoying—disturbing even. First because the attitude you express, if such becomes the majority opinion, doesn’t bode well for the denomination and two, because your emotionally based accusations are both unscriptural and irrational.

I like to think of us as a people that have experienced God's Grace in our lives and are about spreading the Good News of that Grace!

Really Vic do you call infanticide good news? Do you imagine that so called Christian professors at an ostensibly Christian college can in good conscience and with cogent Scriptural support call Christian and vote for a candidate that supports the right to murder the unborn? You are aware of course that such premeditated support makes such a person guilty of that same charge? He is a murderer of the unborn as surely as if he inserted the vacuum hose. And you, YOU, have the audacity to castigate those who call such abhorrent behavior sin and those that support it evil? Are you actually so stupid as to imagine that you can support a murderer with your left hand while spreading the good news of grace with the other?

Here we sound like a bunch of complaining children

The only one whining here Vic is you. And it is the whining of pride, ignorance and naiveté.

.....and so very hard and cold! It really has made me very sad to read this blog and the comments.

Oh really? You do know Vic that Barak Hussein Obama voted against a law that would have mandated that life support be given to those little ones who were born alive as the result of botched abortions? That this man whom 16 professors called Christian prefered that these newborn infants spend their only time in this world struggling to hold onto life alone on a stainless steel tray? That these “Christian” professors call “Christian” a man who thinks it just fine to shove a needle into the base of a tiny skull and terminate the life of partially born little ones? AND YOU CALL THE COMMENTS ON THIS BLOG SAD AND COLD?

I have a great deal of respect for Covenant College and their Mission.

WHAT BIBLE ARE YOU READING VIC?

It is an incredible school.

Oh it’s incredible alright. That professors who call themselves Christian can put their imprimatur on a man who stands for the murder of the helpless is incredible indeed. And disgusting.

Our family experiences of Covenant College have been very positive!

And that settles it? What makes your experience the measure of what is and isn’t right and wrong, good and evil, holy and profane? Obama found his experience with Jeremiah Wright positive. One can only hope your words are based on ignorance rather than positive support for such despicable sins.

My children have been stretched and grown while at Covenant.

And this is really the crux of it all isn’t it Vic? You sent your children to CC and stand aghast that anyone would criticize the source of your “incredible faith stretching experience”. You’re taking this personally aren’t you? You don’t like thinking that you might have made a mistake. Or thinking that these men held these views the whole time your children were there. And you especially don’t like others pointing in out.

They have entered post-college years with an incredible world view and ability to defend their faith. And more importantly, they have a desire to spread God's Grace and Love to others.

Let me be blunt Vic. Had the church you were attending taught, or had you yourself spent the time to learn what it means to be a consistent Christian that takes every thought captive to the obedience of Christ, and had you then passed that knowledge on to your children both you and they would be every bit as appalled at the statistics revealed in this thread as we are. And quite frankly Vic your position here makes me wonder exactly what faith and worldview it is you think you’re defending. A worldview that justifies the slaughter of the innocent and a faith that legitimizes calling evil men good?

I am delighted and proud of every penny that we spent at Covenant College!

And pride goeth before destruction.

"This dualistic and fearful narrative is deeply rooted in McCain’s generation. They were formed in the simple, binary context of Axis and Allies, and then Communists and Free World. ...Senator Obama certainly believes in a strong national defense. But I believe he leans toward a profoundly different narrative. It is a reconciliation narrative, a peace-building narrative, a collaboration narrative. ...Instead of dividing the world into 'us' and 'them,' Obama’s narrative seeks to bring people together in a expanding us. While McCain’s narrative only offers enemies surrender and defeat, Obama’s offers them the possibility of reconciliation. I favor Obama’s narrative or framing story because of two convictions I hold very deeply and passionately. First, I am a committed Christian, and I believe a narrative of reconciliation is in harmony with the teachings of Jesus." (Submergent Church leader, Brian McLaren) http://www.brianmclaren.net/archives/blog/why-im-voting-for-obama-and-wh...

And one third of Covenant's deeply Christian worldview intellectuals responded, "Yea and Amen, such is it transcending powerful truth claims to Heaven and Earth now and evermore thusly authentic shalom!"

* * *

But a tiny voice spoke from the sticky,bloody dumpster, "Collaboration? Peace-building? Reconciliation, Mr. McLaren? Can anyone hear me? Why must I die? Isn't this Lookout Mountain? Are these people blind? Here I am! Can anyone hear me?"

> I like to think of us as a people that have experienced God's Grace in our lives and are about spreading the Good News of that Grace!

Vic -- God's grace doesn't amount to a hill of beans if it doesn't lead us to think that mass murder of helpless innocents is not a "very important" issue. 1 John 3:10 "By this the children of God and the children of the devil are obvious: anyone who does not practice righteousness is not of God, nor the one who does not love his brother." Pointing this out doesn't make us "complaining children" or "hard and cold" -- it makes us normal, historical Christians, filled with the message of hope through repentance. Because you are staunchly PCA you will agree that before grace and the forgiveness of sins comes the law, recognition of sin, sorrow over sin, and repentance. Academics, least of all academics at PCA colleges, should not be given some sort of "no repentence necessary" card and let off the hook.

Isn't this Lookout Mountain?

Gordon Clark is spinning in his grave at turbine speed.

I took that survey, personal testimony! and the question was worded whether we thought the issue of abortion was important in the election. In other words, we were asked if we thought the issue of abortion was first in the minds of the people of America, not what our personal opinions were regarding the issue of abortion or where it should lie in the election. I have classes with said professors and NONE of them have ever promoted abortion and in fact proclaim the Word disaproving of it! I am appalled that a pastor would impugn the honor of his fellow brother in Christ so publically without all of the information at hand.

Catherine -- if you follow the link in Tim's original post he has uploaded a copy of the results of that survey. In the results, it says that question 8 read: "Below is a list of several current issues and concerns that voters might take into account when voting for a candidate. Rate each of these issues for their importance to you in selecting a candidate."

This question is clearly asking about the "importance to you in selecting a candidate", not about whether the American people in general consider the issue important. Tim seems to have all of the information in hand. Would you say that the survey actually filled out by Covenant faculty was worded differently than the report says it was?

I would argue that the question could have been misread especially when it begins with "Below is a lest of several current issues and concerns that VOTERS might take into account when voting for a candidate..." (uppercase added for emphasis). Which is indeed what I did obviously. I would ask that you not judge our professors when all one would need to do is have one conversation with them, take one class with them, or read one of their books to know where they stand in faith instead of basing the strength of their faith on a survey that has a question anyone (including me!) could have misread.

20"My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, 21that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one: 23I in them and you in me. May they be brought to complete unity to let the world know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me. 24"Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world. 25"Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me. 26I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them." John 17:20-26

Gentlemen, do not forget whom you serve. This article is inflammatory, inaccurate, and unjust. This is not the sort of conduct to which we have been called.

Dear Amy,

Thank you for signing your real and full name.

On to your rebuke:

>This article is inflammatory

Intentionally so. It's my hope that what I've written will inflame the donors, trustees, administration, faculty, parents, and alumni of Covenant with a godly passion for the discipline of those paid to profess God's Truth who are unfaithful to that high calling.

>inaccurate

Not at all. Let me remind our readers that David and I make it our habit to write less than we know--not more. If there weren't a problem, the trustees wouldn't be pushing the faculty as they have been for ten years, now. Whether their pushing will be successful remains to be seen.

>and unjust

Christian men with the terminal degree paid to nurture our children in the Word of God which records God's pure hatred for child sacrifice announce that they're planning to vote for the man who believes in child sacrifice, and the one pointing out this abomination is "unjust?"

>This is not the sort of conduct to which we have been called.

Here, you're right. Being a woman, you are not called to it. It's the work of men to discipline other men.

Warmly,

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