Christian home

Whose children are they: a modest proposal for Governor Pence...

Before he died twelve years ago, my brother Nathan was furious over the refusal of our United States Immigration and Naturalization Service to grant political asylum to Chinese couples who, if they returned to their homeland, would be forced to murder their unborn children. Those who have followed the one-child policy of China's Communist dictators implemented in 1978 know such horrors are commonplace. One friend of mine who's an academic at another university got a phone call from a former student in China whose wife had become pregnant. China's apparatchiks were going to murder their unborn child, so my friend arranged for the man to...


On children's preparation for manhood and womanhood...

Fascinating article on children's play forwarded by my daughter, Michal. There's almost nothing here that caused me to cringe or disagree. I'd simply like to point out that it may be better to think of much of children's play as simply little men and women practising for manhood and womanhood.


Take the time and watch this...

Wonderful testimony to our Lord Jesus Christ. Wonderful example of fatherhood after the Father Almighty, a mother in Israel, and brotherhood in Christ. Thanks, Taylor.


Fathers who withhold spankings exasperate their children...

Fathers, do not exasperate your children, so that they will not lose heart. - Colossians 3:21

But if you are without discipline, of which all have become partakers, then you are illegitimate children and not sons. - Hebrews 12:8

Here's a good post reminding fathers and mothers that God our Heavenly Father will hold us accountable for our obedience to His many commands that we spank our children:

You shall strike him with the rod and rescue his soul from Sheol. - Proverbs 23:14


Homeschooling family flees Germany (II)...

This is the second part of the interview with Pastor Walker, a missionary to Germany who was persecuted by the German government for homeschooling his children and now lives in a gypsy village in Romania.


Homeschooling family flees Germany (I)...

Pastor Matthew was in town to visit his son doing graduate work at IU and I had the joy of sitting down with him to talk. After several hours together, I thought it was a waste that no one else was in the room listening, so I asked Luke Trout, our resident video expert, if we could rerun the conversation with him recording it for the blog? He was kind enough to agree and here's the first half.

Pastor Matthew covers much ground, but pay particular attention to his what he has to say about American missionaries in Europe, the dangers homeschooling parents face in the European Union today, the attack upon fatherhood in Germany, the unique challenges he and his wife and children run into living among, and preaching the Gospel to, gypsies in their village in Romania.

Luke Trout has broken the interview in half and this is the first half. We'll post the second half in a few days.


A.W. Tozer: man of prayer, introverted pastor, and Evangelical mystic...

A Review of Lyle Dorsett, A Passion for God The Spiritual Journey of A.W. Tozer (2008)

A number of us have enjoyed the books of A.W. Tozer (including, The Pursuit of God, The Knowledge of the Holy, and Worship: The Missing Jewel of the Evangelical Church), but few of us know anything about his life and pastoral ministry. Years ago, I read James Snyder’s biography of Tozer and learned a lot from it. However, this more brief biography by Dorsett was based on interviews with Tozer’s family and friends, so it gives a more intimate portrait, though that’s a complicated word to use to describe Tozer.

He was born in 1897 in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains of Central Pennsylvania. The third of six children, Tozer’s family was poor and all the children learned the value of hard work that farm life teaches. His father modeled aloofness and insensitivity to his children. He was irreligious and his family did not attend any church, though he encouraged his children to attend school. Aiden Wilson Tozer finished the eighth grade, but that ended his formal education.

The key event in Aiden’s childhood took place when the family home burned down when he was ten years old...


Raising sons and daughters to love their sexual identity...

A man of our congregation e-mailed a link to a piece on another blog written by a pastor's wife lamenting her fears that her son would have to "prove" his manhood among the Christians in her community and church down in Mississippi. The man commented, "the point (in the post) I thought was most interesting (was her writing):

...and so I come back to my sensitive son, with his preference for imaginative games over competitive ones. I wonder if he will soon find himself a misfit in the Christian community, pressured to prove himself—not by his neighborhood friends, who won't care what he is—but by other Christians, who want him to stand up for a certain kind of disappearing manliness.

Responding to this quote from the post, the man responded: "I get that some boys will grow up to be poets, and writers. I was an English major. But, I can testify to the fact that I definitely needed wrestling, and football—not to prove anything, but to learn how to just be tough and a man."

So I went and read the post and left a comment, there...


An updated reading list on sexuality...

Here's a reading list of thirteen books on the meaning and purpose of the two sexes created by God—man and woman. It's been slightly reworked since it was last published.

1. Scripture, starting with these texts
2. Henrik Ibsen: A Doll's House
3. Paul King Jewett: Man as Male and Female
4. Stephen B. Clark: Man and Woman in Christ
5. Walter Neuer: Man and Woman in Christian Perspective
6. Steven Ozment: When Fathers Ruled
7. G. K. Chesterton: What's Wrong With the World or The Thing
8. Doug Wilson: Reforming Marriage


God protects widows and orphans; blesses with fruitfulness and long life...

In my reading this morning, I took delight in several texts. First, this concerning our Heavenly Father's personal care for the widow and orphan:

You shall not afflict any widow or orphan. If you afflict him at all, and if he does cry out to Me, I will surely hear his cry; and My anger will be kindled, and I will kill you with the sword, and your wives shall become widows and your children fatherless. - Exodus 22:22-24)

Oppression of the fatherless leads to...


Day care back in 1649...

Back in 1649, Jeremy Taylor, author of the spiritual classic The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living and the Rule and Exercises of Holy Dying, preached a sermon titled "Of nursing Children, in imitation of the blessed Virgin-Mother." Here's an excerpt proving it's nothing new for Christian women to bear children, then repudiate motherhood leaving their own sons and daughters exposed on the hillside of daycare. Thus it is that their abandoned wee ones become, as Taylor puts it, "foster-children (who) are dearer to the nurse than to the mother."

Bishop Taylor's writing is hard for us today both because of its turgidity and it's directness. Concerning its directness, though, the Church today desperately needs a revival of such pastoral care and rebuke from her pulpits.

* * *

Upon these propositions I shall infer, by way of instance, that it is a duty, that women should nurse their own children. For, first, it is taught to women by that instinct which nature hath implanted in them. For, as Phavorinus the philosopher discoursed, it is but to be half a mother to bring forth children, and not to nourish them; and it is some kind of abortion, or an exposing of the infant, which, in the reputation of all wise nations, is infamous and uncharitable...


The death of motherhood...

This is the pic and headline topping Google's news page just now. But note the pic they chose—a mother home with her baby? Get real.

Take a look at the headline and ask yourself whether anyone anywhere thinks it's sad? Tragic?

Christians do, but why?

Because Christians know from God's Word that our Heavenly Father has ordered His Creation such that woman is made to be the "keeper at home." Start there. While acknowledging the exceptions that prove the rule, primary breadwinners don't outdo their husbands' earnings by being domestic. 

Beyond their rejection of the home, these primary breadwinners have turned their backs on motherhood, too. Working mothers are not mothers. They're chips and capacitors on the motherboard of the American GNP. Motherhood is the glory they have sacrificed for status, power, and money and they're not looking back.

Make no mistake: the cost of woman's repudiation of motherhood is...


Happy 96th birthday, Mom Taylor!

Charm is deceitful and beauty is vain, but a woman who fears the Lord, she shall be praised. Give her the product of her hands, and let her works praisein the gates. - Proverbs 31:30, 31

It has become a tradition each year for the Taylor children and spouses to gather in March to celebrate Mom Taylor's birthday with her. This year Mom turned 96. How beautiful she is, mind, body, and heart! Here are a couple pics to commemorate the occasion: first, a pic of Mom with nine of her ten children (son John wasn't able to be here); and second, a pic of all seven daughters.

(Back row left to right: Cindy, Mark, Marty, Janet, Becky, Peter, Mary Lee; front row: Alison, Mom, Gretchen)


He has denied the faith...

But if anyone does not provide for his own, and especially for those of his household, he has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever. - 1Timothy 5:8

In a nation where the majority of citizens claim to have "a personal relationship" with Jesus Christ, how is it that babies keep being murdered at a rate of 1.3 million per year? How is it that women continue to take on more positions in which, by design and intent, they exercise authority over men? How is it that the family meal has died? That what my Dad called "that huckster" now owns the center of our living room and dying room? That no one practices hospitality any more—except perhaps at restaurants or hotels? That husbands love internet sluts instead of the wife of their youth? That one fifth of our nation's women now arrive at their early forties never having given birth to a child?

Really, the older I get the more sense it makes to me that the New Testament Epistles place such constant and heavy emphasis on simple (or should I say foundational) household matters. Do we really think that killing babies, women sleeping with women and men with men, children defying their fathers, mothers abandoning their children and home for a public life, husbands loving prostitutes instead of the virtuous wife God gave them, wives refusing to submit to their husbands and taking over the leadership of the church and state, smutty plays and drama and poetry, and spoiled cats and dogs are things unknown in the world of the early Christians?


Pilgrimages to India...

Kamilla called my attention to this piece about the draw that Christendom's children feel to demon worship (not that a lot of Christendom's worship hasn't been, and isn't, demon worship also).

Anyhow, likely one of the larger Hindu temples in the country is a mile or so from the house David and I grew up in near the intersection of Army Trail Road and Route 59 thirty-five miles or so northwest of Chicago. Subscribing to Chesterton's view that a man will have no success understanding a religion's texts until he's learned to read their icons, about ten years ago while visiting Mud, Mary Lee and I went over to the temple and walked the campus examining its idols. The evil was palpable.

It was like touring the Mormons' Temple Square, yet maybe opposite? Both worship the lusts of man, but Mormons paint an image of light with words and pictures and Mitt Romney whereas Hindus paint an image that's pitch-black. Mormons market a good package to seduce the half-Christian hoping to go mad: lots of children, pretty families, Christian words and music, Christian Scriptures (plagiarized), and many wives. Hindus have the fertility thing down, too, but they don't bother to lie. They live in a dark land enslaved to the Evil One so they make a principle of the Evil One and his darkness.

I've never been inside a Mormon or Hindu temple but I can tell you neither of the ones I've walked around has windows. Inside, though, I'm guessing the Mormon temples have lots of...


Reflections on my Baptist upbringing...

(My friend Bob Patterson sent me this tribute to his parents and childhood church. I thought it would be helpful to us all, so I asked Bob for permission to post it. Thank you, dear brother. I wish I'd known your Dad and Mom. - TB)

When I returned to my hometown of Cherry Hill, New Jersey, to lay my mother to rest in 2010, the memorial service and subsequent luncheon for family and friends brought back a lot of memories. Held at the same Baptist church where my parents were married and all five of their children were baptized—and where we offered praise to God for my father’s life less than eight years before—my mother’s funeral not only signaled the passing of an era but also compelled me to reflect about all my parents gave to me.

My parents were typical members of the World War II generation. They were high-school sweethearts whose lives were interrupted by the war; for my father, that meant time in the Navy and V-12 program at Tufts, where he earned an engineering degree. They settled not far from where they both grew up, in the close-in Jersey suburbs of Philadelphia. While Dad worked more than 40 years at PECO, a public utility in Center City, Mom gave him five healthy children between 1947 and 1962, whom they raised in a modest Cape Cod that remained the family homestead until after my father’s passing.

Central to their lives was unwavering devotion to the humble church where they started their life together: Erlton Community Baptist Church. It was the first congregation, Catholic or Protestant, established in what would be become a sprawling township of housing developments and a famous shopping mall, but it served an older neighborhood with a mix of families from the literally dirt poor to the college-educated and everything in between. The church exerted a strong presence in the community...


Three cheers for mothers in Israel and daughters of Sarah...

Now in Joppa there was a disciple named Tabitha (which translated in Greek is called Dorcas); this woman was abounding with deeds of kindness and charity which she continually did. And it happened at that time that she fell sick and died; and when they had washed her body, they laid it in an upper room. Since Lydda was near Joppa, the disciples, having heard that Peter was there, sent two men to him, imploring him, “Do not delay in coming to us.” So Peter arose and went with them. When he arrived, they brought him into the upper room; and all the widows stood beside him, weeping and showing all the tunics and garments that Dorcas used to make while she was with them. - Acts 9:36-39

Nine old men. Nine old men. Nine old men.

(chant of striking unionists in reaction to a 1935 Supreme Court decision declaring the National Industrial Recovery Act unconstitutional)

My wife, Mrs. Hale (she’s cheerfully taken my pseudonym), recently sent me a link to an article in The Guardian on the travails of women professionals, especially lawyers. She said I just had to read it, suggesting a blog post might be in order.

The article quotes Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s declaration that she won’t be satisfied until there are nine women on the U.S. Supreme Court. (Three currently serve.) The author of The Guardian piece, who used to work for a law firm, heartily agrees. She says, “It's not unreasonable to think that, at some point, nine of the finest legal minds in the country would belong to women.” 

To which my not-so-fine legal mind responds, “Well, duh.” Buried in this non-newsflash is the assumption that the crème de la crème of legal minds would even want to go to law school, or slog their way to a partnership in a swanky law firm, or maneuver their way into a position to be nominated for a seat on the SCOTUS bench.

Speaking for myself, I could come up with nine of the finest legal minds in America faster than you can say the words “It Takes a Village.”


Pastoral care in times of war and incest...

They heal the brokenness of the daughter of My people superficially... - Jeremiah 8:11a

E-mail has been low in my priorities recently, so I didn't read this or post it on Veteran's Day. But it's worth posting now. The writer, Jeff Ewer, is an elder of Clearnote Church, Bloomington who served in our Armed Forces when he was a younger man. His comments here on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are helpful and they apply to a host of issues where we neglect the soul and the Law of God and thereby fail to comfort the afflicted. And I say "we" because this failure is as common in the Reformed church as it is among other Christians. Warren Kinghorn, the writer of the USA Today article Jeff links to, ends his piece: 

Veterans need a civilian culture that refuses to distance itself from them either through reflexive condemnation or, more commonly, through reflexive valorization. Sometimes, they need communities that can offer the non-medical languages of confession, repentance and forgiveness. And above all, they need to be taken seriously as moral beings who have stood for us in hazy and complicated places and who now bear witness to what that commitment entails.

In the Reformed church, it's usually "reflexive valorization;" I know that's a good characterization of my own care for these men. We must do better, providing them care that applies the Word of God to their killing and probes and welcomes their confessions of sin.

This article is also most helpful in our work exposing and ending child molestation and incest.

My wife and I spent most of the past week out of state working with the elders and pastor of a PCA congregation dealing with sins of incest in a large homeschooling family. Much like war, the horror of incest conspires to silence the application of God's Word to the sinners and victims...


Spin the wheels of cars for hours...

Through the years, a number of children of our church have been autistic. Would you like to know what it is to love your neighbor (or your neighbor's child) as you love yourself?

Here's a good example.


Chilluns, glorious chilluns...

(From left to right; Papa holding Samson Killingsworth, Olivet Killingsworth, Liam Knowles, Grace Knowles, Peter Kim, Paloma Killingsworth, Grant Knowles, Lucas Kim, Judah Kim.)

One of our household fellowship groups went to the park. For your joy, here's a sweet pic of the chilluns. What fruitfulness God has chosen to bless us with! We praise Him!